CarAdvice helps Movember raise more than $15.7m for men’s health

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CarAdvice has helped the Movember Foundation of Australia raise more than $15.7 million dollars for men’s health across the country. Thanks to our highly motivated, 20-strong Movember team – and a huge number of generous donations – CarAdvice managed to raise an impressive four-figure total of $3591 towards the betterment of prostate and testicular cancer, poor mental health and physical inactivity. Not a bad effort for CarAdvice’s first official time supporting Movember – whose primary focus since starting in 2003 has been to seek “breakthrough solutions to help men live happier, healthier and longer lives”. Final numbers won’t be confirmed until next year, but to-date, around 70,000 registered Australian Mo Bros and Mo Sistas have helped raise more than $15,700,000 (at time of publishing). Speaking to CarAdvice at Movember Australia’s Melbourne headquarters, Movember spokesperson Kieran Ryan said, “This year globally, there’s been over 500,000 Mo Bros and Mo Sistas that have registered to take part in the hairy season, which is just fantastic to see.” “And Australia at the moment is sitting currently in second place on the global leaderboard,” Ryan said. “It’s unbelievable to think that that’s the support we have as a foundation.” To date, the Movember Foundation has raised more than $685 million and helped fund over 1000 projects helping change the face of men’s health around the world, and next year, CarAdvice is hoping to do its part once again. A very special thank you to all who donated to Movember and the 2015 CarAdvice Movember team. Of course too, a big thanks to our team members, who included: Sol; Kelvin; Ryan; Paul E; Paul M; Ian; Lionel; Nathan; Paul D; Krystina; Jordie; Robyn and Dennis; Scott; Elke; Nicholas; Brent; Marcus; Kevin and James. Australian men’s health statistics worth remembering: Suicide is the greatest killer of men aged 15-44. Three times as many men die by suicide than women. More men die from prostate cancer than women die from breast cancer. Testicular cancer is the second most common cancer in men aged 18-39. Physical inactivity is the second greatest contributor – behind tobacco smoking – to cancer.