More young drivers using drugs than alcohol

#hashtags: #Inexperience

Inexperience combined with faculty impairments that arise from alcohol or drug use is a lethal mix. More young drivers using drugs than alcohol 23 September 2015 by David Penrose · News Corp Australia network Adelaide's west had the highest number of learner and P-plate drivers caught under the influence of drugs last financial year.Six times as many provisional drivers were captured behind the wheel with drugs in their system than alcohol.South Australian police figures show 59 provisional drivers and eight learners were caught in the west on drugs including speed, ice, ecstasy or cannabis, in the 12 months to June.This compared with 10 caught drink-driving and was despite only one in 10 tests targeting drugs.Traffic Support Branch acting officer-in-charge, Chief Inspector Brett Foster, said provisional and learner licence holders were already at greater risk of having an accident because they lacked experience.Insp Foster said the increase in learner and provisional drivers detected followed an overall increase – as one in 11 drivers screened across the state in 2014/15 tested positive for drugs.He also attributed it to a rise in illicit drug use."Inexperience combined with faculty impairments that arise from alcohol or drug use is a lethal mix," Insp Foster said."Contributing to the high detection rate is the fact that traffic enforcement officers right across the state are now specifically trained to conduct the tests, so detection can occur anytime, anywhere."The number of learner and P-plate drivers caught behind the wheel on drugs was up 116 per cent from 2011/12.He said the state's drug driving detection tactics were relatively new but becoming more effective.Across the west the number of learner and P-plate drivers caught behind the wheel on drugs was up 116 per cent from 2011/12.In the same time the number of provisional and learner drivers testing positive for alcohol dropped by 60 per cent. Insp Foster said roadside testing acted as a deterrent to motorists."It is unlikely that the average road user would understand whether that driver-screening activity relates to alcohol or alcohol and drug testing," he said. Motor Accident Commission road safety general manager Michael Cornish said 24 per cent of motorists killed in 2014 had illegal drugs in their system."Many drivers remain unaware of the effects that illegal drugs can have on their driving ability," Mr Cornish said.MAC is launching a campaign to tackle drug driving next month. Related articles VW diesel scandal goes global22 September 2015 by Joshua Dowling Car karaoke wins $100k Google grant22 September 2015 by James Gorman VW launches investigation into diesel emissions scandal22 September 2015 by William Boston Holden confirms V8 sedan is dead15 September 2015 by Joshua Dowling GM boss promises more right-hand-drive cars out of the US15 September 2015 by Joshua Dowling What to read next Comments Related articles VW diesel scandal goes global22 September 2015 by Joshua Dowling Car karaoke wins $100k Google grant22 September 2015 by James Gorman VW launches investigation into diesel emissions scandal22 September 2015 by William Boston Holden confirms V8 sedan is dead15 September 2015 by Joshua Dowling GM boss promises more right-hand-drive cars out of the US15 September 2015 by Joshua Dowling Related pages Industry news Related cars for sale Search all cars for sale Get the latest news, reviews and advice every week Subscribe '); }