South Australian police want you to dob in a hoon

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TAGS Safety South Australian police want you to dob in a hoon 15 December 2015 by David Nankervis · News Corp Australia network South Australian police are targeting drivers who are found speeding, texting, tailgating, and driving unroadworthy vehicles. South Australia Police are urging the public to dob in law-breaking drivers to help improve road safety, as the state's road toll hit 100 deaths for the year.The call comes as complaints to the police Traffic Watch hotline surged to 21,300 last financial year — 5000 more than police forecast.Rogue motorists were dobbed in for dangerous behaviour including speeding, using handheld mobile phones, tailgating, carelessness and driving unroadworthy cars.Traffic Support Branch Superintendent Anthony Fioravanti said poor behaviour showed a lack of concern for other road users and that police were trying hard to break this culture with the public's help.Supt Fioravanti said nearly half the hotline calls resulted in the driver receiving a warning letter, while almost 1200 were arrested, reported or cautioned by police officers.It only takes a couple of seconds of being distracted for a collision to occurHe said the surge in hotline calls showed people increasingly considered dangerous driving as "unacceptable"."So we encourage the public to report unsafe driving practices to us by calling 131 444 or their local police station," he said."The increase in complaints indicates that road safety awareness is becoming more prevalent and unacceptable driving behaviour is rightfully not tolerated.''Supt Fioravanti said Traffic Watch enhanced road safety because warning letters bring poor driving behaviour to the attention of bad drivers."It lets them know that other members of the public consider their manner of driving as unacceptable," he said.Supt Fioravanti said he welcomed the more than 720 complaints made last financial year about drivers using handheld mobiles."The use of mobile phones distracts drivers from what they should be doing — paying attention to the road," he warned. "Driving is a complex task and should be given the driver's full attention. It only takes a couple of seconds of being distracted for a collision to occur."According to the police annual report, there were 21,304 complaints to Traffic Watch last financial year — exceeding the target by more than 5000 — compared with 16,172 calls in 2012-13. Figures for 2013-14 were not published.The RAA said it supported Traffic Watch as it improved road safety, and believed complaints were increasing despite the dobbing "stigma" because people realised bad driving behaviour played a key role in the rising road toll. RAA spokesman Charles Mountain said people should use the system instead of taking on problem drivers themselves.Do you think the right measures are being taken to crack down on dangerous driving in your area? Let us know in the comments below. Related articles Daytime DUI busts on the increase14 December 2015 by Joshua Dowling Ford Everest fire caused by loose battery connection8 December 2015 by Joshua Dowling Chery J11 recalled due to fuel fire risk4 December 2015 by Richard Berry Simulator demonstrates dangers of texting while driving1 December 2015 by Natalie Savino Gold Coast dubbed "chop shop hot spot" as vehicle thefts rise1 December 2015 by Jack Houghton What to read next Comments Related articles Daytime DUI busts on the increase14 December 2015 by Joshua Dowling Ford Everest fire caused by loose battery connection8 December 2015 by Joshua Dowling Chery J11 recalled due to fuel fire risk4 December 2015 by Richard Berry Simulator demonstrates dangers of texting while driving1 December 2015 by Natalie Savino Gold Coast dubbed "chop shop hot spot" as vehicle thefts rise1 December 2015 by Jack Houghton Related pages Safety Related cars for sale Search all cars for sale Get the latest news, reviews and advice every week '); }